A few years ago, some drawings by Vince Larue appeared in Les Nuits blanches d’Édimbourg, the second collection of my fiction published in French. One of them was for my story “Get Out As Early As You Can.” The version of it above will be part of May’s exhibition, Mom!, at R. Pela Contemporary Art in Phoenix.
If you like Vince Larue’s art and my writing, check out the graphic novel we did together, Dark Heat.

A few years ago, some drawings by Vince Larue appeared in Les Nuits blanches d’Édimbourg, the second collection of my fiction published in French. One of them was for my story “Get Out As Early As You Can.” The version of it above will be part of May’s exhibition, Mom!, at R. Pela Contemporary Art in Phoenix.

If you like Vince Larue’s art and my writing, check out the graphic novel we did together, Dark Heat.

Anonymous asked:

What are your least favorite book genres?

Literary fiction (a.k.a. plotless maundering about privileged people getting their feelings hurt), personal essays, confessional poetry (with the exception of Berryman, who’s often given that label, wrongly in my opinion).

Consider that you can see less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum and hear less than 1% of the acoustic spectrum. As you read this, you are traveling at 220 km/sec across the galaxy. 90% of the cells in your body carry their own microbial DNA and are not ‘you’. The atoms in your body are 99.9999999999999999% empty space and none of them are the ones you were born with, but they all originated in the belly of a star. Human beings have 46 chromosomes, 2 less than the common potato. The existence of the rainbow depends on the conical photoreceptors in your eyes; to animals without cones, the rainbow does not exist. So you don’t just look at a rainbow, you create it. This is pretty amazing, especially considering that all the beautiful colors you see represent less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Anonymous asked:

What's ur favorite Elmore Leonar book?

That’s a tough one. I love most of his books, and really like the ones I don’t love. When people who’ve never read Elmore Leonard ask me which book to try, I suggest Maximum Bob, but I’m not sure it’s better than 52 Pick-Up, Killshot, Unknown Man #89, Out of Sight, Swag, Get Shorty, Freaky Deaky, Pagan Babies, Valdez is Coming, Hombre

Hell, read all his books.

Reports of Manny Pacquiao’s resurrection are greatly exaggerated

I was right in my prediction for the Manny Pacquiao-Tim Bradley fight last night. This is the second time Pacquiao has done it, but the last time two of the judges outrageously gave the decision to Bradley.

This Guardian article, along with several others I’ve read, trumpets that Pacquiao has returned to “vintage form.” But he hasn’t. His steady decline is continuing.

Pacquiao was once a fearsome puncher. Punching power is the last thing a fighter loses with age. But Pacquaio hasn’t stopped any opponent since he gave Miguel Cotto a horrifying beating in 2009 (that fight went almost 12 rounds, but should have been stopped in the first third). All but one of the eight fights he’s had since then - against opponents of varying quality - have gone the distance. The exception was when Juan Manuel Marquez knocked him out in the sixth round.

Pacquiao was a great fighter. Bradley is a good fighter, but no more than that, and he’s a light puncher; only 12 of his 31 wins have been inside the distance. Once upon a time, Pacquiao would have walked through him. He has twice been unable to put him away.

It was good to see Pacquiao win this fight, especially after being robbed in his last encounter with Bradley, but to call it a return to form is wishful, almost magical, thinking. In actuality, Pacquiao is washed up, and ought to retire, or, if his ego doesn’t allow that, to keep fighting run-of-the-mill opponents. Another fight with Marquez would be a bad idea, and a fight with Floyd Mayweather would be a dreadful one. I think Pacquiao at his best would have beaten Mayweather, and I think Mayweather thinks so too, which is why he’s been ducking Pacquaio for years. But the Pacquiao who fought last night could reasonably hope for little more than not to get badly hurt by an on-form Mayweather.

Anonymous asked:

What are your best short stories?

My favorites:

"Big Davey Joins the Majority," which I wrote less than two years ago, and you can read for free here. Prior to that, it had been many years since I wrote a short story, but I wrote another, “Hurt,” a few months ago, and you can read that for free here.

"Get Out As Early As You Can," "What Goes On" and "Either/Or" in my book Get Out As Early As You Can. That book also contains “That Summer,” which Tony Black considers one of my best.

"The Work Ethic," "All the Bad Stuff," "The Guitar," "Cafe in the Rain" and "Deborah" from my book Scumbo.

I’m now writing more stories, so there should be another book of them soon (if I’m spared, as they say in Scotland).